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Edwin and Carolyn Moerbe posing for a photo.
Former Texas A&M University chemical engineering student, Edwin “Ed” H. Moerbe Jr. '61 and his wife Carolyn. | Image: Courtesy of Edwin Moerbe
Carolyn and Edwin "Ed" H. Moerbe Jr. '61 have established the Carolyn and Edwin Moerbe Endowed Mechanical Engineering Scholarship. Distributions from this endowment will be used to provide one or more scholarships to full-time students in good standing pursuing an undergraduate degree in the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University.
 
As previous contributors to the College of Engineering, Carolyn and Ed have a passion for giving back and supporting students. “Education has always been so important to me,” Ed said. “I couldn’t have completed my education at Texas A&M without the scholarships I received, so I promised myself that I would return the favor.”
 
Ed knew he wanted to study chemical engineering after high school and ultimately felt that Texas A&M was the best choice. “Aggie chemical engineers seemed to be the best among the engineers in my hometown,” he said.
 
However, at one point during his time at Texas A&M, Ed was on the verge of having to drop out due to lack of financial funds. After talking to his advisor, Ed was able to receive a scholarship that allowed him to complete his degree. “After receiving that scholarship, I wanted someday to give back to Texas A&M in a meaningful way,” he said. “For me there is no greater joy than giving back.”
 
Ed highlighted that earning his degree from Texas A&M allowed him to gain self-confidence, problem-solving skills and the ability to work with people. “Having these skills meant that I was able to pursue serving people in the corporate world and in my own business,” he said.
 
The Moerbes were inspired to create this additional endowment by their experiences with their church, pastor and local high school, Prince of Peace Christian School where Ed served as chairman of the Board of Education. He was later appointed and served on the Board of Regents of Concordia University Texas and developed a strong interest in helping students get a quality education.
 
Ed and Carolyn became aware of many students, including their pastor’s son, who intended to study engineering at Texas A&M from Prince of Peace and realized they had not established a scholarship geared toward mechanical engineering students. “Carolyn and I decided that giving back now through scholarships at Texas A&M was the best way to help these students and see them succeed,” Ed said.
 
Ed graduated from Texas A&M with his degree in chemical engineering in 1961. During his time as a student, Ed was a member of numerous student organizations. He later received his MBA while working in California’s Silicon Valley. Now retired, Ed and Carolyn reside in the Dallas area.

How to Give

The College of Engineering is one of the leading engineering programs in the United States, ranking first in undergraduate enrollment and ninth in graduate enrollment. Endowments supporting the students in the college have an immeasurable impact on their education. If you are interested in supporting the College of Engineering and its departments or would like more information on how you can give, please contact Haley Jennings, senior director of development.