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Being named a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers is one of the most prestigious honors bestowed upon a very limited number of senior members who have contributed to the advancement or application of engineering, science and technology bringing significant value to our society. | Image: Texas AM Engineering

Dr. Daniel A. Jiménez, professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University, has been named a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) for his contributions to neural branch prediction in microprocessor research and design.

Fellow is one of the most prestigious honors of the IEEE and is bestowed upon a very limited number of senior members who have contributed to the advancement or application of engineering, science and technology bringing significant value to our society. The number of IEEE Fellows elevated in a year is no more than one-tenth of one percent of the total IEEE voting membership.

Jiménez joined the Texas A&M faculty in 2013. He received his doctorate in computer sciences from The University of Texas at Austin, and his master’s in computer science and bachelor’s degree in computer science and systems design from The University of Texas at San Antonio.

His research interests include computer architecture and compilers, with an emphasis on characterizing and exploiting the predictability of programs.