Two students, one female and one male, look at vial full of material. They are in a lab space.

Biomedical Engineering Research

Research in the Department of Biomedical Engineering is focused on four primary areas: Imaging technologies, Medical devices, Regenerative medicine and Sensing and monitoring systems. Toward impacting health outcomes, a hallmark of our research is the focus on translation to the clinic and entrepreneurship.

Research Areas

Research efforts are largely based in optical microscopy, spectroscopy, and magnetic resonance imaging for the purposes of improving the diagnosis of cancer and infectious diseases.

With a strong translational focus and extensive ties to industry, research topics include on-chip systems, devices to support heart healing, interventional stroke and aneurysm treatment, and pediatric devices.

Research advances in biomaterials and biomanufacturing include "smart" materials, biomimetic nanomaterials, 3D printing strategies, cell manufacturing, and wound hemostasis.

Supported by the Center for Remote Health Technologies, research efforts are focused on sensors and point-of-care devices for on-demand detection of biomarkers for chronic disease.

Research News

Researchers at Texas A&M University have fine-tuned the properties of a class of hydrogels so that they can hold on to glucose-sensing molecules more tightly while still allowing glucose to flow in and out.

Dr. Limei Tian received the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering’s Trailblazer R21 Award for her research in biosensors. Tian’s research is expanding the capabilities of biosensors to continuously track protein biomarkers, which could play a role in increasing rapid response to diseases.

Dr. Roderic Pettigrew will be presented with the National Science Board's Vannevar Bush Award. It honors lifelong science and technology leaders who have made exceptional contributions to the welfare of the nation through public service in science and technology and in shaping public policy.


Programmatic Initiatives

Funded by an NSF Engineering Research Center grant, PATHS-UP is working to develop revolutionary and cost-effective technologies and systems at the point-of-care.

The SWPDC is a virtual accelerator that supports pediatric device innovators throughout the pediatric device life cycle and is supported by a grant from the FDA.