Archive for Civil Engineering

Dr. H. Gene Hawkins, a professor in the Zachry Department of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University, was elected chair of the National Committee on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (NCUTD) at the organization’s annual January 2018 meeting for a two-year appointment. Hawkins formerly served as …


The Transportation Research Board (TRB) of the National Academies of Science, Engineering and Medicine held its annual meeting Jan. 7 – 11 in Washington, D.C., and faculty from Texas A&M University were recognized for their contributions to the civil engineering discipline. Dr. Stuart Anderson,…


Jose Cazares, a doctoral student with the Zachry Department of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University, was selected as a recipient of the 2018 Dwight David Eisenhower Transportation Fellowship. The fellowship includes a $5,000 award and was presented to Cazares at the annual Transportation Re…


The state of Texas has more bridges than any other state in the nation, with over 50,000 total. Maintaining structurally sound, shorter- and longer-span bridges was the driving force in two collaborative projects recently completed by Dr. Mary Beth Hueste and the Texas Department of Transportation (…


The Zachry Department of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University announced recipients for the fall 2017 faculty and staff awards at the department’s annual holiday celebration on Dec. 8, 2017. The recipients are as follows:  Zachry Excellence in Teaching – Alireza Talebpour Birdwell Excellen…


An aircraft’s impact on the runway is likely the last thing to cross anyone’s mind when boarding a flight. The constant taking off and landing of aircraft throughout the day places stress on runway pavement, which needs to be in good condition to ensure the safety of the aircraft and its passengers.…


Mangroves are not only found in Mexico, but also along the coastline of other Gulf of Mexico provinces, particularly in Florida and the Caribbean, as well as within the rest of the equatorial belt around the world. The critical role of a healthy mangrove on the local environment is trifold. They re…


On Nov. 2, 2017 the Zachry Department of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University hosted its annual banquet honoring recent donors of endowed scholarships or fellowships, recipients of former student awards and students who were awarded scholarships or fellowships. The distinguished graduate a…


Dr. Charles Aubeny, a professor in the Zachry Department of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University, has produced a new guidebook on groundbreaking geotechnical research titled Geomechanics of Marine Anchors, creating a reference of knowledge based on the construction of offshore anchors for f…


Dr. Jeffrey Otey, an instructional assistant professor with the Zachry Department of Civil Engineering at Texas A&M University, is teaching new and innovative visualization courses that aim to open a new dimension of engineering design for students.   “Problem solving, communication and experie…


There are many ways to show the Aggie spirit. Sam Tomaso, senior in the Zachry Department of Civil Engineering, shaves the number 12 onto his chest for home football games, gaining him the nickname 12th Man Jesus. “I’m just there to have fun. I think it’s great to get the 12th Man more excited than…


The Texas A&M University student chapter of the American Concrete Institute (ACI) recently took the egg drop test to the next level by placing 12th worldwide in the ACI’s international concrete competition of egg protection devices. The team also placed first in Texas and second in North Americ…


It’s no secret to anyone that Texas is hot and that with heat comes drought. Across the more than 269,000 square miles that make up the state, many Texans constantly fight cycles of drought or flooding season after season. In these places, good water management is essential and thanks to new resea…


Engineering Honors at Texas A&M University held its first Undergraduate Research Showcase & Opportunities Fair on Oct. 9th, 2017.


Heavy rainfall during Hurricane Harvey flushed most of the salt water out of Galveston Bay, making the bay extremely fresh. Now, researchers from Texas A&M University are working to collect vital information on how the storm impacted the waterways of coastal Texas. Dr. Scott Socolofsky, profess…